HS2 in Warwickshire - our position on HS2

HS2 in Warwickshire

Adrian Royston/WildNet

The High Speed Two (HS2) railway between London and Birmingham will have a significant impact on wildlife and wild places along the entire route, and Warwickshire Wildlife Trust continues to express deep concerns and opposition to HS2 Ltd's actions.

Hundreds of important habitats and special wild places are under threat, and we are concerned that ancient woodland, lakes, meadows and other important habitats are at risk. Locally, nature reserves within 5 kilometres of the route include Leam Valley, Tocil Wood and Bubbenhall Wood along with a number of Local Wildlife Sites and over 8.1 hectares of ancient woodland will be lost across South Cubbington, Crackley North, Rough Knowles, Broadwells Wood, Sych Wood and North Wood. 

Yet there has not been a Strategic Environmental Assessment and the compensation plans being put forward are not good enough. A Nature Recovery Network would demonstrate that the current approach to HS2 is too damaging to proceed further.

When HS2 was first mooted, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust stated that whilst in principle we support proposals for a more sustainable transport system throughout the UK which reduces our dependency on cars and aviation, a new railway line could only be truly sustainable if the proposed economic gains were sufficiently balanced with the potential environmental impact. The Trust scrutinised not only the potential environmental impacts of the route, but the social and economic case put forward by the government to justify the soundness of the route and the financial viability of undertaking such a project.

As we have from the start, the Trust continues to highlight the destruction that would be caused to ancient woodlands, and the fact there will be no net gain for wildlife along the route. In 2013, the Trust brought a judicial review against the scheme and in 2015, petitioned against it twice at Select Committee. Watch footage here, from 11:14 to 12:32.

At every stage, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust has used all possible legal means to fight for the protection of our local wildlife. 

Cubbington pear tree

The 250 year old Cubbington pear tree sits in the path of HS2

When the first phase of HS2 was given Royal Assent in February 2017, the project shifted from a theoretical possibility to a legally approved reality.

It was at this point that the Trust reacted accordingly to ameliorate the effects on wildlife by working with HS2 Ltd to get the best possible outcome for wildlife. In its capacity as part of Warwickshire, Coventry and Solihull Local Nature Partnership, the Trust belongs to the “West Midlands Combined Authority HS2 Environmental and Landscape (E & L) Board” and through this is able to attend meetings and engage with HS2 Ltd and their partners at a high level.

The Trust recognises the right of local groups and individuals to peaceful protest, and the benefits that this approach can achieve. At the same time we believe the best use of the charity's expertise and resources is to use our leverage at other levels that are only open to organisations such as the Trust, to achieve the same goal - namely the best possible protection of wildlife and wild places along the proposed route of HS2. By working for the same outcome but from different angles, we are confident that Warwickshire Wildlife Trust, its members and local residents can together have a bigger impact for wildlife.

We will continue to challenge HS2 Ltd in order to raise their ambition for the environment and together with our partners - take opportunities through funded projects such as those supported by the Community and Environment Fund in order to ensure that any benefits are directly invested in the areas impacted and inconvenienced by HS2, bringing people closer to nature and creating a land rich in wildlife.  We have not yet received any funding of this kind.

Residents living close enough to the line are rightly able to claim compensation for disruption to their lives and removal from their homes, and we are fighting to gain that same protection for wildlife along the route.

HS2 petition 2014

Ed Green (R) petitions against HS2 in 2014

A timeline of our interaction with HS2

March 2010

The Trust expresses initial concerns about the plans to create a High Speed Rail link (HS2) between London and Birmingham. The charity cite concerns about the line passing through a range of nationally and county important wildlife sites in Stratford-on-Avon and Warwick district, Solihull and North Warwickshire. Fears highlighted about potentially profound effects on some of the county’s most important biodiversity in areas like the Tame Valley.

June 2011

The Trust joins 36 local Wildlife Trusts to co-sign and send a letter to Prime Minister David Cameron asking him to withdraw the current HS2 proposal and fully consider the role of high speed rail in England. The letter expresses shared concern at the potentially serious damage to wildlife and the countryside presented by the development.

July 2011

The Trust submits its HS2 Consultation Response, highlighting concerns on the likely impact the proposed route could have on biodiversity and the natural environment in Warwickshire, Coventry and Solihull.

In particular, the response states that the proposed route between London and Birmingham passes through 4 districts within the county, potentially impacting directly or indirectly on 90 statutory or non-statutory wildlife sites.

March 2012

In support of similar action by Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Willdlife Trust, the Trust writes to the European Commission to lodge a formal complaint over the alleged failure of the UK Government to comply with the SEA and Habitats Directives with respect to the Department of the Transport's High Speed Rail Strategy (HS2).

January 2013

Government confirm the London to Birmingham part of HS2's route. Later this year, the Trust bring a judicial review against the scheme.

May 2014

The Trust petitions against HS2. The petition, which was handed to Parliament by Chief Executive Ed Green, sets out the Trust’s concerns about the HS2 scheme and seeks changes to the Bill to address the negative effects that the proposed railway could have on wildlife in Warwickshire, Coventry and Solihull.

February 2015

Chief Executive Ed Green and Living Landscapes Manager Gina Rowe appear in front of the High Speed Rail (London - West Midlands) Bill Select Committee to discuss the inadequacy of ecological data used in the ecological survey, net gain for biodiversity and potential impact on ancient woodland amongst other issues. They appear a second time in July. Watch footage here, from 11:14 to 12:32.

March 2016

Chief Executive Ed Green is interviewed for a piece in The Guardian titled 'HS2: the human cost of Britain's most expensive ever rail project' - and discussed creating a natural corridor through the countryside, offering surveying expertise and tunneling under South Cubbington Wood.

February 2017

The first phase of HS2 between London and Birmingham is given Royal Assent.

August 2019

Secretary of State for Transport, Grant Shapps MP announces independent, cross-party review led by former Chairman of HS2 Douglas Oakervee into whether and how HS2 should proceed.

How to contact HS2 Ltd

If you have concerns about HS2 construction works and their impact on wildlife in your local area, please contact the HS2 Helpdesk.

Email HS2enquiries@hs2.org.uk

Call 08081 434 434