Cookout damper bread

Damper bread at Bubbenhall Vicky Page

Make your own damper bread - a fun treat cooked over a campfire or barbecue.

This recipe makes around 10 small dampers or 5 thicker ones. 

Ingredients:

  • 300g self raising flour
  • 240ml milk (or enough to bind into dough)
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 75g butter (optional)
  • 1-2 tsp sugar (optional)
  • Plus savoury or sweet flavourings of your choice, if you wish. Here's some ideas: oregano, rosemary, thyme, roasted garlic or garlic powder, cinnamon, nutmeg or a handful of cheese. 
  • Plus sticks or skewers 

What to do:

  1. Mix the bread dough: add the flour, salt and sugar in a large bowl. If using butter – rub into the flour mix until it resembles a fine crumble.
  2. Add flavourings: stir in any extra ingredients. You may want to divide your dough into two bowls and make one savoury version and one sweet! 
  3. Add wet ingredients: mix in the milk a little at a time and stir. Keep going until you have a soft, slightly sticky dough.
  4. Knead the dough for a short time in the bowl (if it is too sticky add a bit more flour).
  5. Tear off pieces of dough the size of a golf ball and roll into a sausage. Stick this onto a stick or skewer. Wrap and twist the dough down the stick and wrap at the bottom to secure it.
  6. Cook your bread sticks!
    1. If you have a fire or fire pit make sure the fire has died down, as flames will blacken the outside of the dampers. Cook the sticks over the embers but not too close.
    2. If you're using a barbecue, prepare it for for indirect cooking on a medium heat (180°C if you have a thermometer). If you are cooking on a gas barbecue with a hood, turn the inner burners off and leave the outer ones on. For coal, build a fire on each side of the barbecue.
    3. They will take from 10 to 20 minutes depending on the thickness. Keep turning them until they are nicely baked  Be patient! Once they're cooked, tap the dough - it should feel solid and sound hollow. 
  7. For sweet dampers you can also dip into jam or chocolate spread.